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Authority record

Rose, Henry

Publisher of The District of Bedford Times in Sweetsburg, Que. from August 1, 1866 until December 24, 1869 -

Rose was also Editor and Proprietor of the Waterloo Advertiser 1870 to 1875 and again from 1880 to 1882.

His envelope in this Supplementary Inventory contains a Biographical Sketch of the life of Henry Rose which is very informative, factual and an orderly account of his origins, his own family and his contributions to newspaper work in the Eastern Townships. It is probably written by J. Powell Noyes, advocate of Waterloo and also one time editor of The Advertiser.

Noyes, John Powell

  • Person
  • 1842-1923

John P. Noyes was born in Potton Township September 15, 1842, the son of Henian and Sarah (Powell) Noyes. He studied law 'with Hon. Lucius Seth Huntington-attended St. Mary's College, Montreal. Practised his profession in Waterloo, Quebec where he was also editor and publisher of the Waterloo Advertiser in 1860's, he was the first Mayor of Waterloo after incorporation. He was an Anglican and a Liberal. In 1891 he became prothonotary at the District of Bedford Courthouse at Sweetsburg. Noyes was a local historian and member and director of Historical Societies of Brome and Missisquoi.

The letters show that he was closely associated with many political and historical figures of his timeseveral young journalists obtained their training under him like W.H. Day (son of Mrs. C.M. Day) and Charles H. Parmelee who went on to become Queen's Printer. He was special attorney and friend of the Huntington family. There were many of the Huntington papers in this collection which show how greatly the family, after L.S. Huntington's sudden death in 1886, depended on him.

J.P. Noyes married Lucy A. Merry of Magog who was an influential and active member in the W.C.T.U. of Quebec. One son, Ralph Noyes, was a well known local school principal in Knowlton and Sutton.

While prothonotary at Sweetsburg he lived in Cowansville in the large brick residence on the Main Street which Dr. A.C. Paintin lived in after and it is still standing. While in Cowansville he assisted the Missisquoi Historical Society in compiling their historical reports which are exceptional records of that period. J.P. Noyes died May 14, 1923.

MacKinnon, James

  • Person
  • 1850-1937

Born in Londonderry, Ireland, June 30, 1850, the son of James MacKinnon and Mary Allen. He came to Canada at a young age, received his education at St. Francis College, Richmond. As a young man entered the banking business. He was associated with the old Eastern Townships Bank - was manager of the E.T.B. in Cowansville from 1876-1900 - Assistant General Manager E.T.B. 1900-1902, General Manager in 1902-1912, he served in the Fenian Raids (medal). He was also elected mayor of Cowansville and Sherbrooke, and Honorary President of the Brome County Historical Society. Married to Emily S Robinson, daughter of Jonathan Robinson of Waterloo, they had one son Cecil Gordon MacKinnon, who became Judge MacKinnon of Montreal and Bondville. The family spent leisure time in Leo Cottage and Inverness Farm in Bondville, Brome County. James MacKinnon died January 28, 1937.

Wilson, Richard Dinnis (1920-1994)

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  • Person
  • 1920-1994

Richard Dinnis Wilson was born in Montréal in 1920. He has traveled across Canada and to most parts of the world, sketching architecture. He is known best for his sketches of Old Montréal, which were published in 1964 in the book called "The Living Past of Montréal", with text by Eric McLean. In the early 1970’s, he visited Bishop’s University, and using the dry-brush illustration technique, he captured fourteen familiar views of Bishop's Campus and Community landmarks. He died in 1994.

Markgraf, Hans, Peter and Traudl

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  • Family
  • ca. 1958-1970

"Silkscreen artists Hans, Peter, and Traudl Markgraf participated in several reproduction programs to promote Canadian art after they immigrated to Canada from Germany in the mid-1950s. The Markgrafs developed a silkscreen process noted for its printing quality and its faithfulness to the original painting. The National Gallery of Canada became involved with the Markgrafs in the mid-1950s when Montreal collector and philanthropist Sidney Dawes introduced then Gallery director Alan Jarvis to the work of the Markgrafs. A collector of the work of James Wilson Morrice, Dawes arranged for the reproduction of Morrice's work, the production of which he financed. The National Gallery also arranged for the Markgrafs to reproduce works by seven other artists from its collection, financed by the Queen's Printer in Ottawa. In 1959, the Markgraf brothers and the Gallery produced a series of "Tom Thomson and Group of Seven" pochoir (silkscreen) prints. Following their partnership with the National Gallery in 1960, the Markgrafs continued on their own, with Hans leaving Canada for Germany and Peter partnering with Artistica, a Montreal-based publisher and distributor of fine art prints, books, and cards. In 1967, the Canada Council partnered with Peter Markgraf to produce prints that focused on contemporary Canadian art. Following this project, the Markgrafs continued to print work for private clients under "Editions Markgraf". In 1977, the Markgrafs moved to Vancouver to work for Bill Ellis of Canadian Native Prints Ltd. They continued to print for individual artists and after 1978, created their own silkscreens of west coast scenery that were later reproduced as lithographs. In the United Nations year of International Cooperation, the Markgrafs printed four Jamaican paintings through Robie Kidd."

Hogarth, William (1697-1764)

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  • Person
  • 1697-1764

Hogarth was born in 1697 near market of Smithfield, England. After apprenticing at a silver workshop where he mastered the art of engraving, Hogarth opened his own print shop. The artist’s first widespread notice came with the publication of The South Sea Scheme (1721), ridiculing the greed and corruption of stock market speculators. A Harlot's Progress (1732) brought Hogarth tremendous success and celebrity, leading to a second morality series, A Rake's Progress (1734). Throughout the 1730s and 1740s, the artist’s reputation grew and so did his interest in social and moral reform. Hogarth’s work took on a distinctly propagandist tone, directed at the urbanization of London and the city’s problems with crime, prostitution, gambling, and alcoholism.
Industry and Idleness (1747) was designed to encourage young boys to develop a strong Protestant work ethic and thus achieve success. Beer Street and Gin Lane (1751), directed at the widespread sale and consumption of alcohol, were followed by The Four Stages of Cruelty (1751), which condemned rampant acts of cruelty to animals.
Hogarth died in 1764 in his home in Leicester Fields. Working almost entirely outside the academic art establishment, he revolutionized the popular art market and the role of the artist. Hogarth strived to create works of great aesthetic beauty but also ones that would help to make London a better city for future generations.

Briansky, Rita (1925- )

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  • Person
  • 1925-

Rita Briansky, painter, printmaker-etcher and teacher, was born in 1925 in Grajewo, Poland. Together with her mother and two sisters, Bella and Becky, the family moved to Ansonville, Ontario in 1929. Here, they joined Briansky’s father and his family in Ansonville, which at the time had a small Jewish community. In 1939, the family moved to Val d’Or, Quebec and finally to Montreal in 1941. Then in her mid-teens, Rita Briansky was a keen student who nourished a continued interest in art. With the move to Montreal, the Briansky Family struggled financially and was unable to afford the fee for Rita’s high school education. It was the Yiddish poet Ida Massey who found Rita a job so she would be able to pay for her schooling. This encouragement served as the beginning of a valuable friendship, as well as helping foster Briansky’s artistic career. Massey later introduced Rita to Alexander Berkowitz who at the time was giving art classes at the St. Urbain Street ‘Y’. Her training and experience quickly expanded, taking the young artist through Montreal’s Ecole des Beaux-Arts and New York’s Arts Student League. In 1949, Rita married fellow painter, Joseph Prezament.The couple had two children together, Anna and Wendy. Briansky’s work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions both in Canada and internationally. Her body of work is diverse in both theme and subject matter, reflecting her interests in fields such as astronomy and the natural world, while remaining deeply rooted in her own experiences. Following her travels to her birth place and memorial sites in Poland in 1995, Briansky produced the ‘Kaddish series’ as her reflection on the trauma of the Holocaust. Other series have broadly used landscape, portraiture and still lifes as a passionate response to the world around her and that speak fundamentally to the human condition. Briansky has participated in multiple collaborative projects, for example the children's book “On Stage, Please” with dancer/ choreographer Veronica Tennant. Briansky is long-established within Montreal’s art community working and living alongside a tight-knit group of artists. In addition, she has worked as teacher, both of art history and studio arts. Briansky’s artistic practice has won her multiple awards and her work is included in the permanent collections of institutions such as the National Gallery in Ottawa, the Winnipeg Art Gallery and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Warrot, Marie-Aimée

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  • Person
  • 1915-1971

Marie Aimeé Warrot was born in France on the 18th of February 1915. She gave her first piano recital at the age of seven. From the age of nine she attended the Conservatoire National de Musique in Paris, until the age of fifteen when she was awarded the first prize in piano. She worked with Robert Casadesus and Alfred Cortot, and also studied in Vienna, Austria with the great pianist Emil von Sauer, who had been a student of Franz Liszt and Nicholas Rubinstein. Marie Aimée Warrot's musical tour of Europe was interrupted by World War II, and recommenced in 1944, encompassing North America in 1955. She gave recitals for television and radio, and appeared with many of the great European orchestras playing all over Europe. In 1969 Marie Aimée Warrot came to live in the Eastern Townships with her husband Bishop's University Professor Claude Treil. Marie Aimée Warrot made two critically
acclaimed musical recordings, the first in 1970 and the second in 1971. In March of 1971 she gave a last recital in Centennial Theatre at Bishop's University. She died in September of 1971.

Voyer, Monique (1928- 2021)

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  • Person
  • 1928-2021

Monique Voyer was born in 1928 in Magog, Eastern Townships. Before going to École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris, Voyer went to the Montréal School of Fine Arts, having as teachers Stanley Cosgrove (1911-2002), Alfred Pellan (1906-1988), and Irène Sénécal (1901-1978). She began teaching at the Cégep du Vieux-Montréal in 1972, before returning permanently Magog in 1979. She is a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. She passed away January, 2021 in Magog, Québec.

Monique Voyer est née en 1928 dans les Cantons de l’Est. Elle fait ses études à l’École des beaux-arts de Montréal et à l’École nationale supérieure des beaux-arts de Paris, en plus d’effectuer plusieurs stages de perfectionnement en estampes et techniques multiples. Elle fut professeure au collégial de 1972 à 1993. Elle est membre de l’Académie royale des arts du Canada. Elle est décédée en janvier 2021 à Magog, Québec.

Sorensen, David (1937-2011)

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  • Person
  • 1937-2011

David Sorensen was born in Vancouver, British Columbia in 1937. He studied at the University of British Columbia and the Vancouver School of Art under painter Jack Shadbolt, (1909-1998) architect Arthur Erikson (1924-2009) and sculptor Bill Reid (1920-1998). He moved to Montréal, Québec in 1965, exhibited sculptures at Expo ’67, and held teaching positions at Montréal Museum School of Art and Design, the Saidye Bronfman Centre and Dawson College. During this time he began showing his paintings across Canada and internationally in Mexico, Switzerland, Italy, Japan, Hong Kong, the Philippines and France. In 1976, he moved to the Eastern Townships of Quebéc with his wife Bella and their family. He taught in the Fine Arts Department at Bishop’s University from 1981 to 2000. His work is represented in Private and Public Collections such as the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, Hamilton Art Gallery, Martineau Walker, (Montréal and Toronto) Avnet Shaw, (New York) and many others.
David Sorensen was inducted in the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in 1996. He died in Montréal in 2011.

Smedley, William Thomas (1858-1920)

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  • Person
  • 1858-1920

William Thomas Smedley was born in Pennsylvania in 1858. He was known as one of the most popular American illustrators of the nineteenth century. His father, a miller and Quaker minister, sent fifteen-year-old William to work for the Daily Local News in Westchester, Pennsylvania. The editor of the paper encouraged his young ​“printer’s devil” to move to Philadelphia to study with Thomas Eakins at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. In the early 1880s, Smedley moved to New York, where his illustrations began appearing in popular magazines. He went to Australia in the mid-1880s to work on a commission for Scribner’s Magazine, and took advantage of his time abroad to travel to India and work in Paris for a time. Smedley returned to New York, where his illustrations sold for top prices, but in the early twentieth century he decided to focus on portraiture. He died in 1920.

Ferron, Marcelle (1924-2001)

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  • Person
  • 1924-2001

Marcelle Ferron was born in Louisville, Québec in 1924. She became interested in art at 15 through an art teacher at the convent she attended. She studied a year at the École des Beaux-Arts, Québec, under Jean-Paul Lemieux (1904- 1990) and Simone Hudon (1905-1985). In 1947 she signed with other artists, the "Refus Global" manifesto originated by Paul- Emile Borduas (1905-1960) and Alfred Pellan (1906-1988). She worked with Borduas in 1950. In 1958 she studied engraving with Stanley W. Hayter (1901-1988) and in 1953 she moved to Paris, returning annually to Montréal for visits. She has exhibited her work at the Galerie Agnes Lefort, La Galérie Soixante, Musée de Sarrebruck, Louvre, Art Moderne, and the Salon des Réalités Nouvelles galleries. In 1960 , as a member of the Non-Figurative Artists Association of Montréal, she exhibited her work at the National Gallery of Canada. She is represented in the Museum of Fine Arts, Montréal, and the National Gallery of Canada. Marcelle Ferron died in Montreal in 2001.

Bartlett, William Henry (1809-1854)

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  • Person
  • 1809-1854

William Henry Bartlett was born in London, England in 1809. He was a topographical painter and between 1821 and 1828 he served an apprenticeship to architect John Britton. Between 1836 and 1852 he made four trips to Canada and the United States. The drawings of Canada made on these trips were published in conjunction with N.P. Willis under the title Canadian Scenery Illustrated, London, 1842. They are a major contribution to Canada's Pictorial History. He died at sea, between Malta and Marseilles in 1854.

Coburn, Frederick Simpson (1871-1960)

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  • Person
  • 1871-1960

Frederick Simpson Coburn ( A.R.C.A. 1920, R.C.A. 1927) was born in Melbourne, Québec in 1871. After attending Saint Francis College in Richmond, he trained as an artist, studying first at the Arts and Crafts School in Montréal and then at New York's Carl Hecker School of Art and the Royal Academy in Germany.
Like many artists from this time, Coburn achieved recognition first as an illustrator and then as a painter. From 1898 to 1913, he illustrated many literary works, including those of William Henry Drummond, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, and Louis Fréchette. Coburn returned to Canada from Europe in 1913. At this time, he began painting Québec landscapes, in particular winter scenes with horses, which became some of his most well-known work.
Coburn's work can be found in The National Gallery of Canada, the National Archives of Canada, the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, and Bishop's University. As well, his work is found in private collections in the USA, Belgium, Germany, and Japan.
He died in Melbourne, Québec, on 26 May 1960.

Bouchard, Lorne Holland (1913-1978)

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  • Person
  • 1913-1978

Born in Montréal in 1913, Lorne Bouchard received his early artistic training at the Barnes School of Art under Wilfred M. Barnes, (1882-1955) and then later at the École des Beaux-arts under Maurice Felix, (1889-1969). He exhibited with the Royal Canadian Academy from the age of 16 on. Clarence Gagnon (1881-1942) encouraged him and the example of Clarence Gagnon (1881-1942) and Maurice Cullen (1866-1934) helped him in his development. He was elected an Associate of the Royal Canadian Academy in 1943 and full member in 1962.
He was regular exhibitor with Royal Canadian Academy, had exhibitions at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Continental Galleries from 1940 and the Walter Klinkhoff Gallery since 1960. In 1959 he won First Prize at the Montréal Hadassah Exhibition. He is represented in the permanent collections of the National Gallery in Ottawa and Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, as well as in very many private Collections in Canada and abroad. He died in 1978.

Speid-Motyer, Janet (1919-2012)

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  • Person
  • 1919-2012

Janet Marian Speid-Motyer was born on 19 January , 1919, in Lennoxville, Québec to Arthur and Helen (nee Sievwright) Speid. Janet attended Bishop's University where she studied business, philosophy, and history, obtaining a BA in 1939. She was also actively involved at Bishop's, working on committees, playing on sports teams, and acting in major roles in theatre productions. She worked for the naval attaché of the Australian Embassy in Washington, D.C, during WWII. After the war, she traveled extensively and worked in Bermuda. She returned to Lennoxville where she worked as secretary to the principal at Bishop's University. Janet was also an accomplished artist. She studied with Canadian artists Arthur Lismer (1885-1969) and Fred Ross (1927-2014) and at the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, at the Abbott School in Washington, D.C., the Beaux-Arts in Sherbrooke. Janet married Arthur Motyer in 1955 and they had two children; Dr. Michael Motyer and Gillian Allan (Motyer). Janet died on 14 July 2012.

Russell, G. Horne (1861-1933)

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  • Person
  • 1861-1933

George Horne Russell was born in Banff, Scotland in 1861 - son of George and Susan (Conn) Russell. He made an early career choice and began to study art at a local school. His talent quickly developed and he was sent to the more advanced Aberdeen Art School, where again his progress outpaced the teaching. He moved to London and became a pupil at the celebrated South Kensington Art School, studying under Prof. Legros and Sir George Reid. He was what might be called a "sound" pupil and with native Scottish tenacity acquired a thorough grounding in the technique of his profession. He developed a decided flair for portrait painting and was encouraged to concentrate on that branch of his art.
Russell executed a few local commissions, but was advised by a friend to move to Canada and "grow up with the country." Accordingly in 1889, at the age of twenty-eight, Russell arrived in Montreal, rented a studio, and established himself as a portrait painter. Among his numerous pictures were the portraits of Sir Alexander Lacoste, Dean Goodwin, Dr. Barbour, Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Lord Strathcona. His circle of sitters grew wider year by year, but Russell was not content to be exclusively a portrait painter. He had a profound love for the country, and more particularly the sea, which made a constant and irrepressible call to his brush. Happily, in 1909, the Grand Trunk Railway made him an offer to paint the Rockies and the Skeena River district of British Columbia. Russell gladly accepted, spent several months in the Rockies, and, on his return, painted some large and impressive canvases of these "unpaintable mountains," several of which (including the great Mount Robson) were sent to the International Exposition at Brussels. A series of canvases of great size and boldness were the result of the Skeena expedition, the well-known Mount Kitselas and Snowshoe Mountain being considered the finest landscapes of their type that had ever been painted in Canada. Russell always looked upon this western experience as of great importance in his development as a landscape painter. The large size of the canvases demanded a breadth of execution, a simplification of detail and the development of a color-scheme that could be carried across a broad space. While these canvases were frankly commissioned as "portraits of the Rockies," they are by no means uninspired transcriptions of the scene but reveal the vision of an artist who was tremendously impressed by what he saw, and succeeded in transmitting that feeling to the beholder. He went west as an illustrator, but returned as an artist.
It seems to the writer that no artist in Canada had a more ideal life than Horne Russell. Portrait commissions came to him in an endless succession, making him independently secure from the usual hazards of the landscape painter's life. Lover of nature as he was, he could quietly indulge his fondness for painting pastoral scenes and seascapes without concern for a future buyer. An approach to landscape painting of this sincerity, motivated by some obscure inner necessity, could only result in work that had the glow of an inspired artist. The result was that such pictures found an appreciative and patronizing public awaiting them. Russell soon reached the position where he could enjoy the comforts of a country house at St. Andrews by the Sea, where, year after year, he spent the summer. Thus his life alternated delightfully between the painting of duck-ponds, fishing schooners, salty little harbors, ribbed sea-shores breaking waves, blue summer seas and, in the winter, the portraits that awaited him. Could an artist ask for more?
Russell struck no profound chords, attempted no criticism of life, but painted his sitters in attitudes of their external best and seascapes that have the charm of poetry. This attitude could be quite expected from so rounded and well-balanced a personality as Russell possessed. His early Scottish training, his very blood, eschewed any departure from the sane and normal point of view. His portraits pleased his sitters, his landscapes and seascapes are undisturbing and pleasing to live with. Russell was a very successful artist.

His academic confreres recognized his essential soundness, and in 1909 he was elected Associate of the Royal Canadian Academy and in 1919 to full Academician. In 1922, he became President of the R.C.A. He was in many ways admirably suited to this post; his dignified manners, his ability to say a few words extempore, and his long association and familiarity with the routine of the Academy made him an ideal president. In 1924, during the Wembley Exhibition (British Empire Exhibition) he crossed swords with Mr. Eric Brown of the National Gallery on the question of the selection of pictures (and other works) for that show. As President of the Academy, Russell considered that he was upholding the privilege and tradition of the R.C.A. in being the sole selective body for pictures sent for exhibition abroad. In this case, the trustees of the National Gallery, in conjunction with artists they selected, were to decide on the pictures to be sent to London. A vote taken at a general meeting of the academy almost unanimously supported the action of their executives. Russell, in his famous letter to the London Daily Telegraph wrote, "the question is of course, one of principal as to whether laymen or professional artists are the best judges." The result of the controversy had wide ramifications, and a considerable number of the academicians refused to send pictures at all. The smoke of this fire is still in some eyes, and the sort of schism created has not been wholly resolved. It is here mentioned as a matter of biographical record.

Russell had no direct pupils, but his efforts to help and direct young artists were never failing, and he seldom missed a meeting of the Women's Art Society, giving constructive advice and all the help he could. He was a member of the Pen and Pencil Club of Montreal. Russell has a secure footing in the realm of Canadian Art. That he was our greatest marine painter may be readily conceded, and he was undoubtedly one of the best portraitists. He knew and painted some of the most distinguished men of his day, and many of these men will be remembered in their physical aspects by Russell's portrait of them. Some of his marines, painted with enjoyable gusto, touch the edge of greatness while his nocturnes are unique in their poetic imaginative quality. Time alone, which winnows without favor, will assign him his ultimate niche in our halls of fame. It is certain, however, that Russell greatly enriched the art of his adopted country, and brought to many homes some glamour of the sea, some aspect of our natural beauty that would otherwise have been missed.
Russell had a quiet and pleasing personality and during his pilgrimage gathered many friends. He was a born "mixer," and could put a nervous sitter at ease with a few words. He never entirely lost his Scottish accent, and his richly rolled R's reminded one of homespun and heather. He was a friend of Sir William Van Horne and might have changed places with him as a great executive, as Van Horne might have been an artist. He was a "big" man, and one suspected his personality had hidden possibilities of achievement in almost any sphere. His reticence was that of a natural gentleman, with all that that proud and dying word connotes.

After a brief illness, he died at St. Stephen, NB on June 24, 1933, and was buried in St. Andrews NB. He was survived by his widow, Miss Elizabeth Morrison; one son, Norman Wells; and a daughter, Mrs. A. J. Mackenzie of Detroit, MI.

Savoie, Robert (1939- )

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  • Person
  • 1939-

Born in Québec City in 1939, Robert Savoie studied at the Institute of Graphic Arts and the École des beaux-arts de Montréal from 1957 to 1962. He completed his education at the Chelsea School of Art in London and at the Atelier 17 in Paris, as well as an internship in Scandinavia and a study tour in Japan. He was able to benefit from the financial support of different prizes and scholarships. He was a professor at the École des beaux-arts de Montréal from 1968 to 1970. Robert Savoie’s works are now found in numerous large private and public collections, most notably in the collection of the Université de Sherbrooke .

Muhlstock, Louis (1904-2001)

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  • Person
  • 1904-2001

Louis Muhlstock was born in Narajow, Galicia, Ukraine in 1904. In 1911, he and his family joined his father who had immigrated to Montréal in 1908. As a teenager, he studied drawing at the National Council of Arts and Manufacturers under the guidance of Edmond Dyonnet (1859-1954) and Joseph Saint-Charles (1868-1956). He then joined the Art Association of Montréal from 1920 to 1928 attending evening classes with William Brymner (1855-1925). During this time, he attended classes at the École des Beaux Arts de Montréal. In 1928 he went to Paris, France and it was there that he studied with Louis-François Bilhoul (1874-1947). Quote “It is with Bilhoul that I really started to paint. He was a very fine, sincere painter, in the tradition of the old masters.” Muhlstock continued to paint, make prints and draw throughout his long lifetime. He died in Montréal in 2001.

Mackie, Stella (1900-1988)

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  • Person
  • 1900-1988

Stella Mackie was born Stella Oldfield in London, UK, on November 27th, 1900. She modeled for Vogue London and other magazines to help put herself through art school in the 1920's. She married Cyril Mackie in Montreal in 1932. A second marriage took place to Douglas Leslie Cox in 1960. She died under the name of Stella Cox on March 19th, 1988 in West Vancouver, B.C.

Jongers, Alphonse (1872-1945)

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  • Person
  • 1872-1945

Alphonse Jongers, a French painter know widely for his portraits, was born in Mézières, France in 1872. His education includes a Bachelor degree in literature from the University of Paris; as well, he studied art at École des Beaux-Arts in Paris from 1889 to 1892 , under French painters , Alexandre Cabanel (1823-1889) , Robert Delaunay (1885-1941) and Gustave Moreau (1826-1898). Later he won a scholarship and spent two years in Madrid, Spain, copying the works of Diego Velasquez (1599-1660). While in Madrid he met American Portrait artist John Singer Sargent (1856-1925). He came to Montréal in 1896 and began doing portraits both in Montréal and New York. He died in Montréal Quebec in 1945.

Watt, Robin (1896-1964)

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  • Person
  • 1896-1964

"Henry Robertson (Robin) Watt, whose works have been exhibited in the Royal Academy in London, in Paris and in major Canadian galleries, was born in 1896, in Victoria, B.C.
He studied at the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst and was commissioned in the Green Howard regiment. In World War I he was awarded the Military Cross and Croix de Guerre. He was wounded four times. For a time he served as aide de camp to Sir Arthur Currie, commander of the Canadian Corps.
He resigned from the army in 1920 and began his studies in art at the Slade School in London. He returned to Victoria in 1927. He then went back to England in 1933 and stayed 14 years. In 1948 Mr. Watt returned again to Canada. He died in Montreal in 1964."

Copied from 1964 New York Times article online.

Jack, Richard (1866-1952)

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  • Person
  • 1866-1952

Richard Jack, a British painter, was born in Sunderland, County Durham, United Kingdom in 1866. He trained at the York School of Art, Royal College of Art, Académie Julian and Académie Colarossi. In 1886 he won a National Scholarship to the Royal College of Art and in 1888 he won a Royal College of Art gold medal. He painted portraits, figure subjects, interiors and landscapes and was the first official war artist for Canada in 1916. He died in Montréal, Québec in 1952.

Newton, Lilias Torrance (1896-1980)

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  • Person
  • 1896-1980

Lilias Torrance was born in Lachine, Quebéc in 1896, the fourth child and only daughter of Alice Mary Stewart Torrance. At sixteen she went to study full time with William Byrmner (1855-1925) at the Art Association of Montréal, where she won a scholarship in Life class in her first year. During the first world war she traveled to London with her mother to help with the Red Cross war effort. During this time she also attended art classes with Alfred Wolmark (1877-1961). After the war, she remained in London and continued to study with Wolmark full time for another 6 months. In 1923 she returned to Europe and studied in Paris with Alexandre Jacovleff (1887-1938) . She was extremely well known for her extraordinary draftsmanship, skill with colour and ability to capture the personality of her clients. She died in Cowansville, Québec in 1980.

Harris, Robert (1849-1919)

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  • Person
  • 1849-1919

Robert Harris was born in Vale of Conway, Wales in 1849. In 1856, his family brought him with them to Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. As a youngster, he was encouraged by his mother to paint. He graduated from Prince of Wales College, Charlottetown in 1863, began work as a land surveyor, and painted in spare time. It was not until 1867 that he traveled to Europe and visited many art galleries, which inspired him to become a professional painter. He began painting in Charlottetown in 1868 and was commissioned by Executive council of Prince Edward Island to paint speakers in House of Assembly 1871. He studied art in Boston 1873-74 under William Rimmer (1860-1879) and Thomas Dewing (1851-1938) and on return worked as a portrait painter. He returned to Europe for study in 1876-78 and copied old master, including paintings by Velasquez (1599-1660) at the National Gallery London. He studied under Alphonse Legros, (1837-1911) and painted in the atelier of Léon Bonnet (1868-1936) Paris. He painted in both oil and watercolour and completed many portraits including those of Earl of Aberdeen, Lord Strathcona, Lord Minto and Sir John A. Macdonald. He was chartered member of Royal Canadian Academy. He died in 1919 in Montréal and was buried in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island.

Hanel, Olaf (1943- )

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  • Person
  • 1943-

Olaf Hanel was born in Prague, Czechoslovakia in 1943. He became a Canadian Citizen in 1982 and lived in the cities of Sherbrooke, Montreal, and Toronto. He has a Master degree in teaching of the visual arts from the Faculty of Education in Pardubice. He has taught art extensively at elementary schools and CEGEP, and illustrated books. As of 2022 he lives Lysá nad Labem, Czech Republic.

Grier, Sir Edmund Wyly (1862-1957)

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  • Person
  • 1862-1957

Born at Melbourne, Australia. Came to Canada in 1876. Studied in London at the Slade School of Art under Professor Alphonse Legros (1837-1911) ; at the Julian Academy in Paris under William A. Bouguereau (1825-1905) and Tony Robert-Fleury (1837-1911) and in Rome at the Sculola Libera. Exhibited in the Royal Academy from 1886-1895, in the National Academy of Design, New York, and at Munich, Berlin and Dusseldorf. Awarded a third class medal at Paris Salon, 1890; a silver medal at the Pan-American Exhibition, 1901. Elected A.R.C.A., 1893, and R.C.A., 1894. A member of O.S.A. since 1898 and President, 1908 -1913.

Abbott, Louise, b. 1950

Louise Abbott was born in Montreal on 26 July 1950. She graduated from McGill University. Freelance writer, photographer, author and documentary filmmaker, she began her career in 1971. Many of her works are dedicated to cultural minorities - the English-speaking community in Quebec, the Inuit. She now lives in the Eastern Townships.

So far in her career, she has published many books and her photographs have also appeared in many other publications. She has been involved in many solo or group exhibitions. Well known public institutions, such as Library and Archives Canada, the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography and the Musée du Québec include her photographs in their collections. She produced her first documentary in 1991.

Louise Abbott has been awarded many times for her work. In 1996, she won a Canada Council grant to write a book about the English-speaking community of the Eastern Townships.

MacDonald, Thoreau (1901-1989 )

  • BUArtColl
  • Person
  • 1901-1989

"Thoreau MacDonald, illustrator, designer, painter (born at Toronto, 21 April 1901; died at Toronto 30 May 1989) was self-taught but worked with his father, J.E. H. MacDonald (1873-1932) founding member of the Group of Seven. Colour blindness forced him to work mainly in black and white. His illustrations, particularly for the Ryerson Press and magazine Canadian Forum, typified a whole period of Canadian Illustration in the 1920s and 1930s. Certain technical mannerisms characterized his work; skies are a series of parallel horizontal lines; clouds are simplified ameboid shapes and trees look like skeletons of conch shells; and his animals recall the art of the ancient Near East, appearing full face or usually, in profile. In general, his subjects recalled his father’s but favoured Ontario farmland. He was one of the first artists in Canada to study factories and construction, but his work is most memorable for his delight in nature."

Richardson, Margaret Thornton, (1882-1968)

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  • Person
  • 1882-1968

Margaret Richardson lived in Lennoxville, Québec and exhibited at the Art Association of Montréal (now Montréal Museum of Fine Arts) from 1934 to 1939.

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