Showing 1670 results

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Briansky, Rita (1925- )

  • BUArtColl
  • Person
  • 1925-

Rita Briansky, painter, printmaker-etcher and teacher, was born in 1925 in Grajewo, Poland. Together with her mother and two sisters, Bella and Becky, the family moved to Ansonville, Ontario in 1929. Here, they joined Briansky’s father and uncle, Jake Perlmutter, and his family in Ansonville, which at the time had a small Jewish community. In 1939, the family moved to Val d’Or, Quebec and finally to Montreal in 1941. Then in her mid-teens, Rita Briansky was a keen student who nourished a continued interest in art. With the move to Montreal, the Briansky Family struggled financially and was unable to afford the fee for Rita’s high school education. It was the Yiddish poet Ida Massey who found Rita a job so she would be able to pay for her schooling. This encouragement served as the beginning of a valuable friendship, as well as helping foster Briansky’s artistic career. Massey later introduced Rita to Alexander Berkowitz who at the time was giving art classes at the St. Urbain Street ‘Y’. Her training and experience quickly expanded, taking the young artist through Montreal’s Ecole des Beaux-Arts and New York’s Arts Student League. In 1949, Rita married fellow painter, Joseph Prezament.The couple had two children together, Anna and Wendy. Briansky’s work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions both in Canada and internationally. Her body of work is diverse in both theme and subject matter, reflecting her interests in fields such as astronomy and the natural world, while remaining deeply rooted in her own experiences. Following her travels to her birth place and memorial sites in Poland in 1995, Briansky produced the ‘Kaddish series’ as her reflection on the trauma of the Holocaust. Other series have broadly used landscape, portraiture and still lifes as a passionate response to the world around her and that speak fundamentally to the human condition. Briansky has participated in multiple collaborative projects, for example the children's book “On Stage, Please” with dancer/ choreographer Veronica Tennant. Briansky is long-established within Montreal’s art community working and living alongside a tight-knit group of artists. In addition, she has worked as teacher, both of art history and studio arts. Briansky’s artistic practice has won her multiple awards and her work is included in the permanent collections of institutions such as the National Gallery in Ottawa, the Winnipeg Art Gallery and the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.

Roberts, William Goodridge (1904-1974)

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  • Person
  • 1904-1974

William Goodridge Roberts was born in Barbadoes, British West Indies in 1904. He trained at the École des Beaux-Arts de Montréal from 1923 to 1925 and subsequently enrolled at the Art Students League in New York from 1926 to 1928. Taking courses with American painter and founder of the Ashcan School, John Sloan, (1871-1951) he began a lifelong commitment to modernism. Moving to Ottawa in 1930, Roberts held his first professional solo exhibition, an annual event that would continue until the late 1960s. He then became the first resident artist sponsored by the Carnegie Corporation at Queen's University (1933–36). Afterwards, he moved to Montréal, where he would remain for most of his life and began regular participation in local and national exhibitions, a pattern he would follow throughout his long career. In 1937, his work had its first international showing in London, followed by his frequent appearance in group exhibitions of Canadian art in the United States and Europe. A year later, he joined John Lyman’s short-lived Eastern Group. In 1939, he became a founding member of Lyman’s Contemporary Arts Society. He died in Montréal in 1974.

Jackson, Alexander Young (1882-1974)

  • BUArtColl
  • Person
  • 1882-1974

Born in 1882 in Montréal, Quebec, A.Y. Jackson was a founding member of the Group of Seven. Eventually working mainly in oil, he received his earliest artistic training in his hometown of Montréal when he went to work for lithography company at age of 12. He began his formal studies in 1902, first working under William Brymner (1855-1925) at the Art Association of Montréal, and later at the Chicago Art Institute from 1905 to 1907. Immediately following his education in North America, Jackson traveled to Paris to study under Jean Paul Laurens (1838-1921) at the Académie Julian where he was heavily influenced by Impressionism. Subsequent to his studies, he traveled and painted England, France and Italy, and returned to Québec in 1914.With their focus on capturing the Canadian landscape, the paintings that Jackson produced upon his return attracted the attention of fellow artist J.E. H. MacDonald (1873-1932) and Lawren Harris (1885-1970). They eventually convinced Jackson to move to Toronto, where he shared a studio with Tom Thomson (1877-1917) and become involved in all major group trips to Algonquin Park, Georgian Bay, Algoma and the North Shore.Jackson exhibited with the Group of Seven throughout the 1920s. He also made regular sketching trips to Québec in the spring, travelled to regions such as the Canadian Artic in the summer and returned to the studio in Toronto to paint his canvases.
With a career that remained active into his eighties, Jackson exhibited with the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts from 1904- 1957 and with the Art Association of Montreal from 1903 to 1946. He died in Kleinberg, Ontario in 1974.

Perrigard, Hal-Ross (1891-1960)

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  • Person
  • 1891-1960

Hal-Ross Perrigard was born in Montréal in 1891. Although he was mostly self-taught, he did take classes from Art Association of Montréal (now Montréal Museum of Fine Arts) with both William Brymner (1855-1925) and Maurice Cullen (1866-1934) . He was part of Montréal's Beaver Hall Group and participated in Royal Canadian Academy and Art Association of Montréal exhibitions, winning the Jessie Dow prize in 1921. (The Jessie Dow prize was awarded by the Art Association of Montréal at their Annual Spring Exhibitions for excellence in oil, watercolor, and sculpture.) He belonged to the Artist Run Centres Association, the Arts Club, the Artist Guild of Canada and the North Shore Arts Association of Glouchester, The Pen and Pencil Club and Rockport Art Association. He lived and decorated the corridors of Westmount Richelieu apartments. He died in Montréal in 1960.

Gagnon, Clarence A. (1881-1942)

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  • Person
  • 1881-1942

Clarence Gagnon was born in 1881 in rural Québec. He is known for his Québec landscapes; in particular, the Charlevoix region and the Laurentians. He began his study of painting in 1897 under William Brymner (1855-1925) at the Art Association of Montréal (now Montréal Museum of Fine Arts). He studied in Paris at the Académie Julian under French painter Jean Paul Laurens (1838-1921). While in Paris he met other Canadian painters such as James Wilson Morrice (1865-1924) where he picked up Morrice's technique of "painting quickly on the spot". He died in Baie St. Paul, Québec, in 1942.

Cosgrove, Stanley (1911-2002)

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  • Person
  • 1911-2002

Stanley Morel Cosgrove was born in 1911 in Point St. Charles, Montréal. He studied art at the École des Beaux-Arts de Montréal from 1928 to 1935. In 1936 he furthered his art education at the Art Association of Montréal where he took figure painting under Edwin Holgate (1892-1977). In 1940 he went to the Academia Nacional de San Carlos in Mexico where he studied fresco murals under Jose Clemente Orozco (1883-1949). He was active in the field of textile designing , working with a group of artists which included Paul-Émile Borduas (1905-1960) and Françoise Sullivan (1925-) . He taught at the École des beaux-arts from 1944 to 1958 and at Queen’s University in Kingston in Ontario in 1952. He is represented in the collections of the Art Gallery of Ontario, Hart House, University of Toronto; the Vancouver Art Gallery, and the National Gallery of Canada. He was a member of the Canadian Group of Painters, Royal Canadian Academy (ARCA 1951). He died in 2002.

Caron, Paul (1874-1941)

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  • Person
  • 1874-1941

Paul Archibald Caron was born in Montréal in 1874. He studied drawing and painting under Canadian artists William Brymner (1855-1925), Maurice Cullen (1866 -1934), and Edmond Dyonnet (1859-1954) at the Art Association of Montréal (now the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts). He worked for 11 years in the stained glass industry making drawings for ornaments and figures and then for La Presse and the Montréal Star doing pen and ink drawings. He was a magazine designer and illustrator but eventually turned to full time painting. Caron usually painted the old buildings and ancient areas of Montréal and Québec City as well as Laurentian winter landscapes. Caron exhibited with the Royal Canadian Academy and the spring shows of the Art Association of Montreal; Ontario Society of Artists, and the Fine Arts Section of the Canadian National Exhibition. He died in 1941.

Taylor, Frederick Bourchier (1906-1987)

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  • Person
  • 1906-1987

Frederick B. Taylor was born in Ottawa, Ontario in 1906. He studied architecture at McGill University and in 1927 he won McGill's Anglin Norcross Prize for drawing. After graduating in 1930, he exhibited and worked in Britain and Canada, settling in Montréal in 1937. He taught drawing at McGill School of Architecture and painted portraits to make a living, however, his paintings often had the subject matter of the hard work and people in Canadian factories. He died in Mexico 1987.

Hunter, William S. Jr. (1823-1894)

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  • Person
  • 1823-1894

William S. Hunter Junior was born at St. John (now St. Jean-sur-Richelieu) Québec in 1823. He married Miss Nancy Parsons of Stanstead and they had two daughters and one son. In the Canada Directory of 1857-58, he was listed as an artist, illustrator and designer. In 1867 he was listed as a mining broker and 1875 as a manufacturer of boots, shoes and harness. He died November 29, 1894 and is buried in Stanstead, Québec.

Gill, Mary Catherine (1861-1946)

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  • Person
  • 1861-1946

Mary Catherine (Minnie) Gill was born in Pierreville , Québec in 1861. She was an artist known for her landscapes of the Eastern Townships and Charlevoix regions. She exhibited at the Art Association of Montréal Spring Exhibitions from 1897 to 1920 and at Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in 1899. She died in Lexxonville Québec in 1946.

Hellebuyck, Victor (1950- )

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  • Person
  • 1950-

Originally from El Salvador, South America, Victor came to the Eastern Townships in 1980 (with his wife who is a native Quebecer) to escape the war in El Salvador. He began his studies in Biology and Fine Arts at Bishop's University. He often wandered around the Johnville Bog, armed with sketchbooks and butterfly nets to procure subjects for his watercolour paintings. In 1984, the El Salvador Post office published a series of six postage stamps with the birds drawn by Victor Hellebuyck.

Coburn, Frederick Simpson (1871-1960)

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  • Person
  • 1871-1960

Frederick Simpson Coburn ( A.R.C.A. 1920, R.C.A. 1927) was born in Melbourne, Québec in 1871. After attending Saint Francis College in Richmond, he trained as an artist, studying first at the Arts and Crafts School in Montréal and then at New York's Carl Hecker School of Art and the Royal Academy in Germany.
Like many artists from this time, Coburn achieved recognition first as an illustrator and then as a painter. From 1898 to 1913, he illustrated many literary works, including those of William Henry Drummond, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, and Louis Fréchette. Coburn returned to Canada from Europe in 1913. At this time, he began painting Québec landscapes, in particular winter scenes with horses, which became some of his most well-known work.
Coburn's work can be found in The National Gallery of Canada, the National Archives of Canada, the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, and Bishop's University. As well, his work is found in private collections in the USA, Belgium, Germany, and Japan.
He died in Melbourne on 26 May 1960.

Kinsman, Kay (1909-1998)

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  • Person
  • 1909-1998

Artist Kay Kinsman was born in Los Angeles, California on 27 June 1909. Kinsman attended private school in Havana, Cuba; Jamaica; and New York City. She then studied at the Parsons School of Applied Arts in Paris, the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, and the Malvern School of Art in England. Kinsman met Ronald Lewis Kinsman in Paris and was married him there in 1932. The couple had three children. It was Ronald Kinsman's appointment at IBM that brought the couple to Montréal in 1937 or 1938. The city was Kay Kinsman's home until 1971, when, having been a widow since 1965, she went to England for several years to paint. In 1981, she returned to Québec, settling in Lennoxville. Since living in Lennoxville, she obtained BAs in two fields from Bishop's University (1983) and an M.A. in medieval history from McGill University. Kinsman specialized in water colours but worked in other media at various times. She illustrated several books and has published three books of her sketches: "Montréal Sketchbook" (1967), "Broadway Sketchbook" (1974), and "Lennoxville Sketchbook/Sur le vif" (1990). Over the years, she participated in several exhibits in England and Canada. In 1989, Bishop's University awarded Kinsman an honorary doctorate. She passed away in August, 1998, at the age of 89.

Harris, Tony (1964- )

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  • Person
  • 1964-

Tony Harris graduated from Bishop's University with a BA in Fine arts. He has a successful career painting Canadian golf courses however now he is known more for his Hockey player portraits. He lives and works in Ottawa, Ontario.

Correia, Jean Michel (1958- )

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  • Person
  • 1958-

Originally from France, artist Jean-Michel Correia (1958- ) has been established in Montréal for many years. His academic background in architecture and fine arts led him to studio arts, which he has been practising for 35 years. At once colourful and minimalist, his works have been exhibited in cities such as Paris, New York, Miami, and Seoul. Jean-Michel Correia has taught in the Design department of the Faculté de l’aménagement at the Université de Montréal, and in the Master’s program in Pratiques artistiques actuelles at the Université de Sherbrooke. He is also a curator, an art critic, and a doctoral candidate in Études et pratiques des arts at UQAM.

Buffet, Bernard (1928-1999)

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  • Person
  • 1928-1999

Born in Paris in 1928, Bernard Buffet was a painter, lithographer, and etcher who studied at the Paris École des Beaux-Arts and gained early critical acclaim and fortune through his prolific output – he painted more than 8,000 works in his lifetime – and immediately recognizable stylistic manner. Active during a time when abstraction was the predominant artistic style, Buffet defended representational art and was an active member of the anti-abstraction group L’homme Témoin (The Witness-Man). He died in 1999.

Motyer, Arthur

  • Person
  • 1925-2011

Arthur John Motyer was born December 15, 1925 in Hamilton, Bermuda. He attended Saltus Grammar School and later Mount Allison University (1942-1945). A Rhodes Scholarship took him to Oxford for further studies in English, after which he returned to Canada where he taught English and Drama at the University of Manitoba (1948-50) and Bishop’s University (1950-70). Arthur Motyer married Janet Speid in 1955 and they had two children; Dr. Michael Motyer and Gillian Allen (Motyer). While at Bishop’s University, he led the development and realization of the Centennial Theatre, giving Bishop’s the finest university theatrical facilities in Canada at the time. Returning to Sackville in 1970 as Purvis Professor of English and Associate Dean of Faculty, he immersed himself in the cultural life of campus and community. In addition to taking on the roles of Dean of Arts and Vice-President Academic, he served for many years as Chair of the Performing Arts Committee and of the classical concert touring organization Debut Atlantic, founded Windsor Theatre and the Mount Allison Drama Program, and was mentor and founding chair of Live Bait Theatre. In his retirement, he wrote two distinguished books, the novel What’s Remembered and a memoir, The Staircase Letters.Arthur Motyer died on June 23, 2011 in Sackville, New Brunswick. In September 2011, Arthur was posthumously awarded the Bermuda Arts Council 2011 Lifetime Achievement Award.

Corbet, Christian ( 1966-)

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  • Person
  • 1966-

Christian Cardell Corbet (born 31 January 1966) is a Canadian sculptor, painter and designer. He co-founded and was first President of the Canadian Portrait Academy. He is the Regimental Sculptor of the Royal Canadian Regiment and Sculptor in Residence for the Royal Canadian Navy. He resides in Sackville, New Brunswick.

Fox, John R. (1927- )

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  • Person
  • 1927-

John R. Fox was born in 1927 in Montréal, Québec. He attended Museum of Fine Arts School from 1946 to 1949 under artists Goodridge Roberts and William Armstrong. He was awarded a scholarship to study at the Slade School for 1952-53. Later he recieved a grant from Memorial Foundation which allowed him to study in Florence in 1955-66. He was influenced by Goodridge Roberts, and impressionist artists Matisse, Bonnard and Dufy. He painted and drew a wide variety of genre which included, landscapes, portraits, interiors, figues, and still lifes. His work is represented in major public, corporate and private collections in Canada, the United States and Europe.

Canada Games 2013

  • Corporate body
  • 2013

The 2013 Canada Summer Games was a national multi-sport event that was held in Sherbrooke, Quebec from August 2, 2013 to August 17, 2013. Bishop's University was the venue for two sports: basketball and soccer. These Games were the first Canada Summer Games to be held in Quebec, and third overall after the inaugural Canada Winter Games in Quebec City in 1967 and the 1983 Canada Winter Games in Saguenay. Sherbrooke hosted the 2013 Canada Summer Games from August 2nd to the 17th. It made its mark with many innovations and successes, including the event’s recognition as sustainable, fair-trade, and carbon care Games, the establishment of an Office of the Ombudsman for volunteers, and free admission to Closing Ceremonies for everyone. 6329 volunteers, 14 897 participants including 3400 athletes and 150 sponsors contributed to the success of the Canada Summer Games–Sherbrooke 2013. Team Ontario proved once again to be a tremendous competitor, winning the Canada Games Flag. Nova Scotia took home the Jack Pelech, B.C won the Claude Hardy and Manitoba awarded Centennial Cup.

Ross, W. Gillies (1931-2019)

  • Person
  • 1931-2019

William Gillies Ross, most commonly known as Gil Ross, was born in 1931. He married Anne MacIver and together they had four children: Deborah, Lucy, Peter, and Ian. Gil was a graduate of Ashbury College, the Royal Military College of Canada, McGill University and Cambridge University. In 1961 he founded the Department of Geography at Bishop's University and was named Emeritus Professor of Geography in 1992. Gil was known as a passionate teacher to several generations of Bishop's students in whom he instilled a love of learning, intellectual curiosity and academic integrity. He was also an all-around athlete, an avid skier, an accomplished photographer, a scholar of international repute, an authority on Arctic whaling and exploration, an Eastern Townships historian, and a prolific author. Among his published works are: Three eastern townships mining villages since 1863 : Albert Mines, Capelton, and Eustis, Quebec; Arctic whalers, icy seas : narratives of the Davis Strait whale fishery; This distant and unsurveyed country : a woman's winter at Baffin Island, 1857-1858; Hunters on the track : William Penny and the search for Franklin.
Gil passed away on October 7, 2019, in Sherbrooke, Quebec.

Coulter, Gerry

  • Person
  • 1959-2016

Gerry Coulter was born Bernard Gerard Coulter in Kingston Ontario on August 14, 1959 to Madeline and Gerald Coulter, both of whom are deceased. After taking a BA in Philosophy and History, then an MA in Sociology at Queen's University, Gerry completed his Doctoral degree in Philosophy (Sociology) at Carleton in 1992. Gerry's academic teaching career began at St. Thomas More College in Saskatoon in 1992, where he met his future wife, Mary Ellen. After a year teaching at Carleton, Gerry joined the faculty of the Sociology Department at Bishop's University in 1994 where he contributed to the growth of the department and the success of the university until his death. He was extensively published including three books and about 100 articles. He founded the innovative, free-access International Journal of Baudrillard Studies in 2004, and is recognized across the world as the expert on Baudrillard and his ideas. Gerry was an extraordinarily talented and caring professor. He was appreciated and respected as a faculty member who inspired and encouraged students to discover their strength and worth. Gerry was awarded Bishop's University's highest award for teaching - the William and Nancy Turner prize. In the words of former student Laura Smith, " Gerry was not only my favorite professor and the reason that I've kept on with academia and Baudrillard studies, but a true friend. It was the support, encouragement, and positivity from Gerry that propelled me onwards at many forks in the road. The amazing thing is that, as you know, this inspiration and encouragement was felt by so very many students. Gerry's teaching allowed students to challenge their own assumptions in ways that pointed them not toward a predetermined end, but toward developing confidence in their own critical thinking ability. This generous, infinite gift - developing one's inner well of strength - will stay with me my entire life ." Gerry loved keeping in touch with many of his students in the years after they studied with him. Gerry Coulter died suddenly on Nov 24 2016. He is survived by his partner of 23 years, Mary Ellen Donnan, who is also a Sociology professor at Bishop's University.

Derick, Herbert, 1916-1994

  • Person
  • 1916-1994

Local historian Herbert Derick was born in Noyan, Missisquoi County, on 2 September 1916. He studied in Bedford before working in industry and commerce. He married Lucille H. George and together they had three children: Brian, Jane and John. At the beginning of the 1960s, Herbert moved to Lennoxville. From 1964 to 1980, he worked as Regional Industrial Commissioner for the Department of Industry, Trade and Commerce of Canada. A member of the United Empire Loyalists' Association of Canada, Derick for many years researched the history of the Missisquoi County and the pioneers of the Eastern Townships, accumulating a massive quantity of documentation. He died on 8 February 1994.

Ward family (Thetford, Que.)

  • Family

Robert G. Ward (1837-1907), was born in Lower Ireland, Megantic County, the son of Rev. Robert G. Ward and Marianne Turriff. He married Annie M. Cairns (born 1861, daughter of Hamby Cairns and Susan Meagher, died 1936). Together they had nine children: Robert Grant "Bob" (1883-?), Hamby Ward (1884-?), Alexander Harry (1885-1964), John Albert (1888-1942), Charles Edgar (1890-1891), James Turriff (1892-?), Annie Maria (1893-1893), Peter Douglas (1895-1977?), and Albion Tudor (1898-1962). Robert G. Ward (II)'s pursuit of mining interests began in 1876 when the discovery of asbestos was made in one of his fields. Subsequently, he purchased the mining rights for the lot in Thetford Township and began the Ward family's mining intersests in the area.

Albion T. Ward, miner by profession, was married first to Nita Hammerick/Hammerich in 1925 (divorced 1944), and second to Doris Christine Peterson (1913-1986). Robert Grant Ward (III) went west to mine gold as a young man. By 1903, he had turned to amateur boxing in San Francisco. His ability in the ring led him to take the title of amateur heavyweight champion of America and, later on, pro heavyweight champion of the British Commonwealth. Later on he returned to Quebec to pursue mining. Alexander Henry (a.k.a. Harry) Ward married Agnes Gertrude Moore (b. 1899), daughter of William Moore and Sarah Elizabeth Robinson. Together they had seven children: Dorothy (a.k.a. Dolly, b. 1917), Kathleen (b. 1919), Evelyn (b. 1919), Agnes (1921-1921), Robert (1923-1923), Marjorie (b. 1924), and Lois (b. 1928). Lois T. Ward married Wilfred Alan Greatrex in 1950 in Ontario.

Carr, M. Emily (1871-1945)

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  • Person
  • 1871-1945

Born in 1871 in Victoria, British Columbia, she was educated there until the age of 16. In 1888 she went to San Francisco, California, to study art, returning to Victoria in 1895 to set up a studio to paint and teach art. She had great interest in the local indigenous people and their art. She associated with and was influenced by the Group of Seven artists from the East of Canada, particularly A. Y. Jackson, J.E. H MacDonald and Lawren Harris in Toronto. She was known for her love of the Pacific Coast. As she got older and her health failed, she turned to writing and published several books. She died in 1945.

Hurtubise, Jacques (1939-2014)

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  • Person
  • 1939-2014

Born in 1939 in Montréal, Québec, Hurtubise studied at the École des beaux-arts de Montréal from 1956-1960 under Albert Dumouchel (1916-1971) and Jacques de Tonnancour (1917-2005) and Jean Simard. He showed great talent and by 1960, at the age of 21, Hurtubise had his first major exhibition at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. After being awarded the Max Beckman scholarship, he moved to New York City to continue his studies and became part of the abstract expressionist scene. He died in Nova Scotia in 2014.

Bowen, Minnie Hallowell (1861-1942)

  • Person
  • 1861-1942

Minnie Hallowell Bowen was born in Sherbrooke on 4 February 1861. She was the daughter of John Hallowell, a lawyer, and Helen Maria Clark. On September 10th, 1890, she married Cecil H. Bowen, son of George Frederick Bowen, and had two children, Lloyd H. and Rose Meredyth. Minnie Hallowell Bowen was active in various philanthropic, patriotic, religious, and literary organizations such as the Women's Auxiliary Missionary Society, the Sherbrooke Patriotic Association, the Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire, the Women's Conservative Association, the Canadian Authors' Association, and the Sherbrooke Choral Society. She published six books and booklets of poetry; she also wrote literary texts that were published in newspapers and periodicals. She used a few pen names: the Drum-Major, Jane of Brompton Road, and possibly Rapier. She died in Quebec City in 1942 and was buried in the Elmwood Cemetery in Sherbrooke.

Munster, Albert Andrew

  • Person
  • 1891-1981

Lieut.-Col. Albert Andrew Munster was a trustee of the university from 1944 to 1973, a member of the Executive Committee of Corporation of Bishop's University from 1944 to 1970 and Vice-President of Corporation from 1947 to 1966. Active in Sherbrooke industrial life (Canadian Silk Products) and community enterprise he also chaired the committee which supervised the building of the present Sherbrooke Hospital. He received a DCL from Bishop's University 1949. A.A. Munster died in Sherbrooke in 1981 at the age of 90. Residence building Munster Hall was erected and named in his honour in 1966. He was married to Natalie M. Seemeyer, and was father to James, Harry and Nancy (Mrs. Lawrence McDonough, Bishop's Class of 1952). Harry Munster was married Molly Colvil, was father to Barbara Lee, Andy, John, Elizabeth Clark, and to Cynthia Munster Hewitt. Harry passed away in British Columbia in 2011.

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