Coburn, Frederick Simpson (1871-1960)

Identity area

Type of entity

Person

Authorized form of name

Coburn, Frederick Simpson (1871-1960)

Parallel form(s) of name

Standardized form(s) of name according to other rules

Other form(s) of name

Identifiers for corporate bodies

Description area

Dates of existence

1871-1960

History

Frederick Simpson Coburn ( A.R.C.A. 1920, R.C.A. 1927) was born in Melbourne, Québec in 1871. After attending Saint Francis College in Richmond, he trained as an artist, studying first at the Arts and Crafts School in Montréal and then at New York's Carl Hecker School of Art and the Royal Academy in Germany.
Like many artists from this time, Coburn achieved recognition first as an illustrator and then as a painter. From 1898 to 1913, he illustrated many literary works, including those of William Henry Drummond, Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, and Louis Fréchette. Coburn returned to Canada from Europe in 1913. At this time, he began painting Québec landscapes, in particular winter scenes with horses, which became some of his most well-known work.
Coburn's work can be found in The National Gallery of Canada, the National Archives of Canada, the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts, and Bishop's University. As well, his work is found in private collections in the USA, Belgium, Germany, and Japan.
He died in Melbourne, Québec, on 26 May 1960.

Places

Legal status

Functions, occupations and activities

Mandates/sources of authority

Internal structures/genealogy

General context

Relationships area

Access points area

Subject access points

Place access points

Occupations

Control area

Authority record identifier

BUArtColl

Maintained by

Institution identifier

Rules and/or conventions used

Status

Level of detail

Dates of creation, revision and deletion

Language(s)

Script(s)

Sources

MacDonald, Colin S. A Dictionary of Canadian Artists, Volume 1, A-F, 1st ed., Canadian Paperbacks Pub, 1967. p 134-1135.

Maintenance notes

  • Clipboard

  • Export

  • EAC

Related subjects

Related places